Refiguring the Future
Feb
8
to Mar 31

Refiguring the Future

Refiguring the Future
February 9—March 31, 2019
205 Hudson Gallery, Hunter College Art Galleries
New York, NY 10013

Opening Reception: February 8th, 6-8pm 
During the opening reception, artists Bararak adé Soleil and Lauren McCarthy will be activating their work. American Sign Language interpretation will be provided at the opening.

Conference: February 9-10, 2019
February 9th, 2018
10am – 6pm
Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College
695 Park Ave, New York, NY 10065

February 10th, 2018
12pm – 6pm
Knockdown Center 
52-19 Flushing Ave, Maspeth, NY 11378

Refiguring the Future is organized by Eyebeam and REFRESH in collaboration with the Hunter College Art Galleries.

Curated by REFRESH collective members Heather Dewey-Hagborg and Dorothy R. Santos, the exhibition title is inspired by artist Morehshin Allahyari’s work defining a concept of “refiguring” as a feminist, de-colonial, and activist practice. Informed by the punk ethos of do-it-yourself (DIY), the 18 artists featured in Refiguring the Future deeply mine the historical and cultural roots of our time, pull apart the artifice of contemporary technology, and sift through the pieces to forge new visions of what could become. 

The exhibition will present 11 new works alongside re-presented immersive works by feminist, queer, decolonial, anti-racist, and anti-ableist artists concerned with our technological and political moment including: Barak adé Soleil, Morehshin Allahyari, Lee Blalock, Zach Blas*, micha cárdenas* and Abraham Avnisan, In Her Interior (Virginia Barratt and Francesca da Rimini)*, Mary Maggic, Lauren McCarthy, shawné michaelain holloway*, Claire and Martha Pentecost, Sonya Rapoport, Sputniko! and Tomomi Nishizawa, Stephanie Syjuco, and Pinar Yoldas*. 

*Denotes participation in conference.

SUPPORT 
Refiguring the Future is supported by grants from the Open Society Foundations and John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation as part of NetGain. This partnership is a philanthropic collaboration seeking to advance the public interest in the digital age.

Additional support for the presentation of Refiguring the Future at the Hunter College Art Galleries is made possible by the David Bershad Family Foundation, the Susan V. Bershad Charitable Fund, Inc., Carol and Arthur Goldberg, Agnes Gund, Joan Lazarus, and the Hunter College Foundation.

VENUE ACCESSIBILITY

205 Hudson is an accessible space. The entrance and lobby is on the ground floor at 205 Hudson at Watts St.  The mezzanine level is accessible via a wheelchair lift. Restrooms are located on the ground floor and are wheelchair accessible. 

Kaye Playhouse is an accessible venue. The conference entrance and lobby are located at 68th Street, between Park and Lexington, on the north side of the street, through the courtyard. Accessible entrance is available by ramp on the left side of the courtyard. Restrooms are located on the ground floor and are wheelchair accessible.

The Knockdown Center is an accessible venue. The conference entrance is located on 52-19 Flushing Ave at 54th St through a parking lot. The accessible entrance is available by ramp in front of the building. Restrooms are located on the ground floor lobby area and are wheelchair accessible.

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Performance: shawné michaelain holloway
Mar
28
7:00 PM19:00

Performance: shawné michaelain holloway

  • Hunter College MFA Program Flex Space, Room 200 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Thursday, March 28
Performance at 7pm
Doors open at 6:30pm

Hunter College MFA Program Flex Space, Room 200
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013

Free and open to the public

_.Scheduled(VariableRatio):secondary-conditioned-immediateReinforcement(s)-handlerSearch1_DrillAndPracticeVERSION2.exe, is an interactive experiment in operant conditioning to articulate the structure of intimacies inherent in behavioral training.

In a training session for a human puppy and her handler, positive and negative reinforcements are enacted in a circle between audience members and the performer. Engaged together through a system of exchange, they mutually agree on how to choreograph the giving and receiving of a reward. As rewards and punishments offer potentially precarious and playful communication, this choreographic transfer of power is an act of BDSM. Through this temporary relationship, called “pick-up play,” viewers witness a visceral dance that asks questions about how consent is communicated, what qualifies as violence, and how desire can manifest.

_.Scheduled(VariableRatio):secondary-conditioned-immediateReinforcement(s)-handlerSearch1_DrillAndPracticeVERSION2.exe is part of holloway’s ongoing Chambers Series (2017–present), which is comprised of performance scores and their partner publications that illustrates a series of BDSM acts.

shawné michaelain holloway uses sound, video, and performance to shape the rhetoric of technology and sexuality into tools for exposing structures of power. She has spoken and exhibited at institutions internationally, including the New Museum, New York; Sorbus Galleria, Helsinki; The Kitchen, New York; the Institute of Contemporary Arts,London; and the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. holloway teaches digital publishing theory and practice in the New Arts Journalism department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her books (- - -), i'd lie if i could even, and no separation were published in 2018 as part of the TOO OFTEN IN THE DARK series, an ode to bondage, refusal, and wild women. holloway is also a sex educator, teaching classes and writing about intersectional approaches to exploring our bodies and our kinks.

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Verbal Description + Touch Tour of Refiguring the Future with Museum Educator Paula Stuttman
Mar
23
2:00 PM14:00

Verbal Description + Touch Tour of Refiguring the Future with Museum Educator Paula Stuttman

Saturday, March 23
2–3:30 PM

205 Hudson Gallery
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013

Free and open to the public

Detailed verbal descriptions and selected touch objects will provide an opportunity for visitors who are blind or have low vision to experience the exhibition. This tour will focus on the dynamic artworks and themes put forward by the artists and curators.

RSVP is requested. For more information or to RSVP please email j.soto@eyebeam.org or call (347) 378-9163.

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This Platform Life, a performance by In Her Interior, with Petra
Feb
15
6:30 PM18:30

This Platform Life, a performance by In Her Interior, with Petra

  • Hunter College MFA Program Flex Space, Room 200 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Friday, February 15
Doors open at 6:30 PM
Performance at 7:00 PM

Free and open to the public

Hunter College MFA Program Flex Space, Room 200
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013

This Platform Life (a command line memoir)

In Her Interior and Petra will perform This Platform Life (a command line memoir). This Platform Life is a memoir, looking back to look forward at a life lived in the futurepast, platform stacking, stratifying, and avatar jumping, where the flesh in all its porosity leaks data into the dataocean to become a multiplicity in univocity. Hyperleaping from platform to platform and avatar to avatar, exhuming zombie shells and webbing, messily.

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body.

In Her Interior
Formed in 2015, In Her Interior co-creates and performs live works of spoken, sung, and recorded text and video within site-specific installation environments. As two of the four co-founders of cyber-feminist group VNS Matrix (est. 1991), da Rimini and Barratt have contributed to critiques of gender and technology for over three decades. Her Eyes Were As Black As Coal… is a new work by the Australian collective, on view in Refiguring the Future.


Petra
Petra (aka Waste Heat) is a Milwaukee-based sound artist & DJ whose ambient/techno mixes are really taking off in the Midwest and beyond. This is the first time they have performed live with In Her Interior, and in New York, although they have collaborated on sporadic philosophy gigs together.

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Refiguring the Future Conference: February 9-10, 2019
Feb
9
to Feb 10

Refiguring the Future Conference: February 9-10, 2019

Refiguring the Future Conference: February 9-10, 2019

Day 1, Saturday, February 9: Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College
695 Park Ave, New York, NY 10065
http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/kayeplayhouse
Day 2, Sunday, February 10: Knockdown Center
52-19 Flushing Ave, Maspeth, NY 11378
https://knockdown.center/

Tickets available now
Eyebeam presents Refiguring the Future: an exhibition and conference organized by REFRESH, produced in collaboration with Hunter College Art Galleries.

Refiguring the Future will open with a two-day conference that will convene 500 participants and provide space to build community, learn, and share ideas. Unpacking the key frameworks within the exhibition, the conference grapples with the marginalizing states of technology in order to propel us to envision formative futures.

Reserve your seat now for two days of talks, hands-on learning, performances, screenings and more across two incredible venues!

The Refiguring the Future conference convenes an array of artists, educators, writers, and cultural strategists to envision a shared liberatory future by providing us with collective imaginings that move beyond and critique oppressive systems to offer alternative possibilities.

Keynotes speakers include Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor and Zach Blas. Featured participants include: micha cárdenas, Taeyoon Choi, Sofía Córdova, Jaskiran Dhillon, Kadija Ferryman, Shannon Finnegan and Bojana Coklyat, Anneli Goeller, Kathy High, shawné michaelain holloway, In Her Interior (Virginia Barratt and Francesca da Rimini), Yo-Yo Lin, Maandeeq Mohamed, Rasheedah Phillips, Sofía Unanue, Alexander Weheliye, and Pinar Yoldas (list in formation).

The first day of the conference will consists of keynote presentations and panel discussions while the second day will feature a series of community-engaged programs and workshop sessions.

The Refiguring the Future conference is co-organized by Eyebeam/REFRESH Curatorial and Engagement Fellow, Lola Martinez, and REFRESH collective member Maandeeq Mohamed.

In an effort to keep the conference affordable for all participants we are offering a range of ticket options and we encourage you to purchase at whatever level works for you! All tickets are for general admission entry and cover activities across both venues as well as coffee, tea, and lunch on each day.


ACCESSIBILITY
All Refiguring the Future event venues are accessible. For more information and updates, including contact information, please visit: www.eyebeam.org/rtf

LIVE STREAM
The Refiguring the Future Conference will be livestreamed.
Day one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwgwRdxQtI4

Day two: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCa36fWJhyk



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Hunter MFA Thesis Exhibition: Part II
Dec
15
to Jan 9

Hunter MFA Thesis Exhibition: Part II

HUNTER MFA THESIS EXHIBITION PART II

December 15, 2018–January 9, 2019

Opening: Saturday, December 15th, 5–8pm

Corey Allen
Alison Kizu-Blair
Michelle Hernandez Vega
Lila Jamail
Jessi Li
Wai Ying Zhao
Jason Rondinelli
Christopher Roberson

For more information on this exhibition hours and the artists, visit: http://www.mfa205hudson.org/mfa-thesis-exhibitions/fall-2018

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Hunter MFA Thesis Exhibition: Part I
Nov
10
to Dec 2

Hunter MFA Thesis Exhibition: Part I

HUNTER MFA THESIS EXHIBITION PART I

November 10 – December 2, 2018

Opening: Saturday, November 10th, 3–6pm

The Hunter College MFA Program in Studio Art is pleased to announce Part I of the Fall 2018 MFA Thesis Exhibition at 205 Hudson Street, November 10 – December 2, 2018. 

The exhibition will feature seven MFA Candidates: 

Jordan Artim
Patricia Ayres
Amanda Brown
Joseph Burwell
Amy Butowicz
Nathan Sinai Rayman
Kyle Utter


The exhibition will be open seven days a week from 11am–6pm, and is free and open to the public. The seven artists in the exhibition represent an array of art making practices, including painting, sculpture, photography, video, performance, and site-specific installations. 


For more information on this exhibition and the artists, visit: http://www.mfa205hudson.org/mfa-thesis-exhibitions/fall-2018

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Stephen Mueller: Orchidaceous
Sep
13
to Oct 28

Stephen Mueller: Orchidaceous

Stephen Mueller: Orchidaceous

Curated by Carrie Moyer and Sarah Watson with Agnes Gund Curatorial Fellows Evan Bellantone and Sophia Ma and Hunter MA and MFA students enrolled in the Advanced Curatorial Certificate

205 Hudson Gallery
September 14–October 28, 2018
Opening reception: September 13, 2018, 6–8pm
Gallery hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

 

Stephen Mueller: Orchidaceous presents a rare look into the late painter’s oeuvre during a period of rigorous creative transformation. The exhibition traces Mueller’s formal and conceptual evolution from his high-octane, impetuous gestural work from the late 1980s to the spatial complexity, exquisite color and sensuous facture of his late paintings. With over 40 paintings and works on paper, this will be the artist’s most comprehensive exhibition to date.

Stephen Mueller (1947–2011) was part of a loose-knit group of New York-based artists—including Mary Heilmann, Jonathan Lasker, Elizabeth Murray, Thomas Nozkowski, David Reed, Pat Steir, Gary Stephan and others—who transformed and reenergized American abstract painting during the late 1970s and 1980s. Building on the tenets of Color Field painting, Mueller’s subtle, luminous images anticipate many of the concerns of contemporary painting. The work overflows with visual puns and associations through sophisticated re-combinations of Asian iconography, cartoons, encyclopedic decorative traditions, new-age sensibility, and electric, synthetic color. Through his endlessly innovative use of acrylic paint, his canvases become portals into radiant space. The trajectory of Mueller’s work reveals an artist deeply committed to inventing his own articulation of the spiritual—an impulse that has particular appeal and resonance for painters working today.

Stephen Mueller: Orchidaceous is the result of generous collaboration with the Estate of Stephen Mueller; Texas Gallery, Houston; and Lennon, Weinberg, Inc., New York. The exhibition is accompanied by a richly illustrated publication containing an essay by curator Carrie Moyer; Mueller’s own writing; and interviews with painters in Mueller’s creative circle, including Robin Bruch, Joe Fyfe, Judith Hudson, Shirley Kaneda, Melissa Meyer, Carl Palazzolo, Ellen Phelan, Pat Steir and Billy Sullivan. A full schedule of public programing will accompany the exhibition.
 

Stephen Mueller had nearly 50 solo exhibitions during his lifetime. His paintings were included in numerous group exhibitions across the U.S., Europe, and Asia, including in two Whitney Biennials (1987, 1995). Curated by Klaus Kertess, Mueller’s 2003 mid-career exhibition was held at the Joslyn Museum, Omaha, NE. He was the recipient of grants and fellowships from the NEA, NYFA, the Gottlieb Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation and the Pollock-Krasner Foundations, among others. Between 2003 and 2011, Mueller was a frequent contributor for artcritical.com, Gay City News, and Art in America. His work is held in the collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the High Museum, Atlanta; the Brooklyn Museum; the Birmingham Museum of Art; and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, among others. His estate is jointly represented by Texas Gallery, Houston; and Lennon, Weinberg, Inc., New York.

 

Public Programming

Saturday, September 22, 4pm
Artist-led walkthrough with Joe Fyfe, Carrie Moyer, and Carl Palazzolo

Tuesday, September 25, 7pm
The Gallerists: A panel discussion on the intimate relationships and histories between gallerists and artists.

With Margaret Liu Clinton (Koenig & Clinton), Michael Findlay (Acquavella Galleries), and Fredericka Hunter (Texas Gallery and the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation). Moderated by Carrie Moyer.

Hunter College MFA Program Flex Space, Room 200
205 Hudson Street

Wednesday, September 26th, 6–9pm
205 Hudson Gallery open late for the 9th edition of Tribeca Art Night

Saturday, October 27
4pm | Artist-led walkthrough with Josh Blackwell, Carrie Moyer, and Arlene Shechet
6–8pm | Closing reception with performance by Ariana van Gelder

 

Stephen Mueller: Orchidaceous is made possible by the generous support of the David Bershad Family Foundation, the Susan V. Bershad Charitable Fund, Inc., Carol and Arthur Goldberg, Agnes Gund and Joan Lazarus in support of the Curatorial Certificate Program, and the Evelyn Kranes Kossak Fund for exhibition programming.

The Hunter College Art Galleries also thank Paula Cooper Gallery, Larry Gagosian, Marian Goodman Gallery, and David Zwirner for their generous contributions to the Curatorial Certificate Program.

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Closing Weekend Events for Axis Mundo: Zine Fair, Panel Discussion, T-Shirt Making, and Reception
Aug
18
7:00 AM07:00

Closing Weekend Events for Axis Mundo: Zine Fair, Panel Discussion, T-Shirt Making, and Reception

CLOSING WEEKEND EVENTS FOR AXIS MUNDO: QUEER NETWORKS IN CHICANO L.A.
ZINE FAIR, PANEL DISCUSSION, T-SHIRT MAKING AND RECEPTION 


Saturday, August 18, 1:00–7:00 PM
Free and open to the public

205 Hudson Gallery
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
Entrance on south side of Canal Street between Hudson and Watts

1–7PM / Zine fair
The Bettys, Discipline Press, Luna Rio, Precog Magazine, Cósmica, Sula Collective, and 3 Dot Zine

 

2–3:15PM / Panel discussion
Joey Terrill, Rudy Garcia, Tamara Santibanez, and Kameelah Janan Rasheed

 

4PM / T-shirt making workshop with Joey Terrill

 

6–7PM / Closing Reception

 

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PERFORMANCE NIGHT: Keith Lafuente and ray ferreira
Aug
2
1:00 PM13:00

PERFORMANCE NIGHT: Keith Lafuente and ray ferreira

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PERFORMANCE NIGHT: Keith Lafuente and ray ferreira
in conjunction with Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A. followed by a conversation with Emmy Catedral

Thursday, August 2nd, 7:00 PM
Free and open to the public

205 Hudson Gallery
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
Entrance on south side of Canal Street between Hudson and Watts


Performances by ray ferreira and Keith Lafuente, followed by a brief conversation moderated by Emmy Catedral.

Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A. is curated by C. Ondine Chavoya and David Evans Frantz and was organized by ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives at the USC Libraries in collaboration with The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, and is organized as a traveling exhibition by Independent Curators International (ICI). The presentation at the Hunter College Art Galleries has been organized in collaboration with Chief Curator Sarah Watson and Exhibitions Manager Jenn Bratovich. 

Programming organized by Hunter College Axis Mundo fellows Mathew Galindo, Khari Johnson Ricks, and Joseph Shaikewitz. 

BIOGRAPHIES

EMMY CATEDRAL is an artist working in performance and installation with things made with paper, including books. She also makes work as The Amateur Astronomers Society of Voorhees and The Explorers Club of Enrique de Malacca. Emmy was born in Butuan, and raised in Iloilo City and Queens, NY. She is the Coordinator of Fairs & Editions for Printed Matter, Inc. 

RAY FERREIRA w h e n a m i blaqlatinx from occupied Lenape lands called New York, N Y: the illegitimate EEUU. An o t the r Corona, Queens a spacetimemattering a materialdiscusive (dis) continuity: [the Caribbean, the Greater Antilles, Hispañola, the Dominican Republic —> Corona, Queens] : history. 

w h e n a m i a performer of sorts aka multidisciplinary artist aka polymath. She stays playin : the dance between materiality<->language through her body w h e n a m i where histories are made and remade. She plays with iridescence, text, rhythms (aka systems), to cruise a quantum poetics. Englishes, Spanishes, and other body languages spiral, dance, and twirl to create a banj criticality: that turnup w/the grls; that swerve past white cishet patriarchy. wh e n ami

She can be located museum educating at the Studio Museum in Harlem, as well as floating through other museum education departments. In addition, she lead teaches at the Octavia Project (a summer institute for teen girls and nonbinary youth), and freelances for various artists. w h e nam i Other intersections of space|time|matter include residencies at the Institute for Electronic Arts and EmergeNYC, performances at the Segue reading series, Dixon Place, and the Brooklyn Museum of Art, and slightly different performances in Femmescapes: Vol 2 and The Felt: Issue 4. whenami She engaged in a durational performance to obtain an expensive piece of paper (an MFA in Studio Art) from Hunter College. 
 

KEITH LAFUENTE (b.1992) is a multidisciplinary artist, often working with the body to unravel identity and articulate desire. Straddling the mundane and the theatrical, Lafuente's work reenacts dominant tropes and reconfigures them into something more intimate and possibly more absurd. He also performs under the stage name Mahal Kita, which translates to "I love you" in Tagalog. Lafuente currently lives and works in NY.

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Visual AIDS Talk + Tour of Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A.
Jul
17
12:30 PM12:30

Visual AIDS Talk + Tour of Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A.

Gerardo Velázquez,&nbsp; The Neglected Martyr , 1990. Acrylic on canvas, 80 x 66¼ in. (203.2 x 168.3 cm). Gift of the Nervous Gender Archive. ONE National Gay &amp; Lesbian Archives at the USC Libraries. Photo by Fredrik Nilsen

Gerardo Velázquez, The Neglected Martyr, 1990. Acrylic on canvas, 80 x 66¼ in. (203.2 x 168.3 cm). Gift of the Nervous Gender Archive. ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives at the USC Libraries. Photo by Fredrik Nilsen

 

Visual AIDS Talk + Tour of Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A.

Tuesday, July 17, 6:30 PM

Free and open to the public
Invite friends on Facebook here

205 Hudson Gallery
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
Entrance on south side of Canal Street between Hudson and Watts

Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A. is the first exhibition of its kind to excavate histories of experimental art practice, collaboration, and exchange by a group of Los Angeles based queer Chicanx artists between the late 1960s and early 1990s. To highlight the New York iteration of Axis Mundo, Visual AIDS and the Hunter College Art Galleries host a guided talk and tour with an intergenerational group of creatives who knew artists highlighted in the exhibition or have been influenced by the artworks included in the show.

The Visual AIDS Talk + Tour of this landmark exhibition, curated by C. Ondine Chavoya and David Evans Frantz, will center the work of artists lost to AIDS-related complications with reflections by Simon Doonan on Mundo Meza (1955–1985) and Aldo Hernandez on Ray Navarro (1964–1990). To explore the intersections of art, AIDS and activism in the exhibition, the tour will also include comments by J. Soto, Lauren Argentina Zelaya and Alexandro Segade.

As noted in the AIDS Activism(s) section of the exhibition: “The devastation of the AIDS epidemic was acutely felt by intersecting Latinx and queer artist communities. In the face of government neglect, many artists politicized their practices, often taking inspiration from their earlier participation in gay and lesbian and Chicano rights movements. Working within community and advocacy groups, artists sought to raise awareness and educate through quickly produced and accessible mediums such as video and print material. Many artists memorialized those lost to the disease, while others took up their own mortality and disability as content for their work through abstraction and conceptual distance.”
 

Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A. is curated by C. Ondine Chavoya and David Evans Frantz and was organized by ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives at the USC Libraries in collaboration with The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, and is organized as a traveling exhibition by Independent Curators International (ICI). The presentation at the Hunter College Art Galleries has been organized in collaboration with Chief Curator Sarah Watson and Exhibitions Manager Jenn Bratovich. 

Speaker Biographies

Simon Doonan is a writer, bon-vivant, window dresser extraordinaire and fashion commentator who has worked in fashion for over 35 years. Doonan has won many awards for his groundbreaking and unconventional window displays, including the CFDA Award. In 2009, he was invited by President and Ms. Obama to decorate the White House for the Holidays. Doonan describes his relationship with Mundo Meza: “I met Mundo in 1979. We became boyfriends for a couple of years, after which we remained close pals. We were also creative collaborators, working together on various window displays and videos.”

Cuban-American Aldo Hernández and Chicano Ray Navarro both honed their commitments to society through artistic projects in California and then re-located to NYC. Hernández landed jobs with MoMA and Creative Time, and while visiting LA in 1988 was introduced to Navarro at latin gay party Vasilon through a mutual friend from MoCA where Navarro worked. That June, Navarro moved to NY where they became close friends, AIDS activists, and Art+Positive collaborators until Navarro’s death in November 1990. During that summer, Hernández had begun DJing at the Clit Club & MEAT, where he melded a passion for the groove with graphics and photography as he dove into a life long calling of the sonic & visual. It was an urgent vital time in both their lives that remains powerfully conveyed through Navarro’s incisive art & writings focused on young queers of color.

Alexandro Segade is an interdisciplinary artist whose multimedia science fiction performances exploring queer futurity have been presented at the Broad Museum, REDCAT and LAXART, LA; Yerba Buena Center, San Francisco; Time-Based Arts Festival, Portland, Oregon; Movement Research/Judson Church, Park Avenue Armory, NYC, and Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, Bard College, NY. Since 2001, Segade has worked in the collective My Barbarian on exhibitions, videos and performance projects at venues including the New Museum, MoMA, The Kitchen, Participant Inc., NY; Museo El Eco, Mexico City; the Hammer Museum, LACMA, MoCA, Susanne Vielmetter Gallery, LA; the 2014 Whitney Biennial, Performa 05 and 07. Segade’s recent writing has been published in Yale’s Theater Journal and artforum.com, and he is cohost of the podcast Super Gay! 

J. Soto is a queer brown transgender interdisciplinary artist, writer, and arts organizer. His collaborative writing project, "Ya Presente Ayer" can be found in Support Networks, Chicago Social Practice History Series (University of Chicago Press). His recent writing can be found in Original Plumbing and Apogee Journal: Queer History, Queer Now Folio and American Realness 2018: Reading. A Chicano raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, J. is interested in sex as an embodied way of learning queer history, the impact of AIDS on queer communities of artists and feeling loss through a racialized lens and through the portrayal of sensual bodies in Axis Mundo

Lauren Argentina Zelaya is a cultural producer, curator, and museum educator based in Brooklyn, NY. As Assistant Curator of Public Programs at Brooklyn Museum, Zelaya curates and produces Target First Saturdays and other free and low-cost public programs that invite over 100,000 visitors a year to engage with special exhibitions and collections in new and unexpected ways. Lauren is committed to collaborating with emerging artists and centering voices in our communities that are often marginalized, with a focus on film and performance and creating programming for and with LGBTQ+, immigrant, and Caribbean communities. Recent projects she presented include Cuerpxs Radicales: Radical Bodies in Performance and Black Queer Brooklyn on Film. Known and respected equally for her nail art and her fierce commitment to bringing art and culture to the people, Lauren was named one of Brooklyn Magazine’s 30 Under 30 in 2018.

 

 

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Tour and Open House with Axis Mundo Curators and Artists
Jun
23
9:00 AM09:00

Tour and Open House with Axis Mundo Curators and Artists

Participants in the Christopher Street West Pride parade wearing Joey Terrill’s  malflora  and  maricón &nbsp;T-shirts, June 1976. Terrill appears third from the left. Photo by Teddy Sandoval. Courtesy of Paul Polubinskas.

Participants in the Christopher Street West Pride parade
wearing Joey Terrill’s malflora and maricón T-shirts, June 1976. Terrill appears
third from the left. Photo by Teddy Sandoval. Courtesy of Paul Polubinskas.

 

Tour and Open House with Axis Mundo curators and artists at 205 Hudson Gallery
Saturday, June 23, 2018, 3–6 PM

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano LA at the 205 Hudson Gallery
 

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Opening Reception, Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A.
Jun
21
12:00 PM12:00

Opening Reception, Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A.

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  Teddy Sandoval,&nbsp; Las Locas , c. 1980. Acrylic and mixed-media on unstretched canvas, 39 x 52½ in. (99 x 133.4 cm). Courtesy of Paul Polubinskas. Photo by Fredrik Nilsen

Teddy Sandoval, Las Locas, c. 1980. Acrylic and mixed-media on unstretched canvas, 39 x 52½ in. (99 x 133.4 cm). Courtesy of Paul Polubinskas. Photo by Fredrik Nilsen

AXIS MUNDO: QUEER NETWORKS IN CHICANO LA
An exhibition of work by a collaborative network of over 50 LA-based queer Chicanx artists produced through the 1960s to 1990s

Curated by C. Ondine Chavoya and David Evans Frantz

Hunter College Art Galleries: 205 Hudson Gallery & Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Gallery
June 22–August 19, 2018

Opening Reception for Axis Mundo
Thursday, June 21, 2018, 6–9 PM
205 Hudson Gallery
205 Hudson Street, New York, NY 10013
Entrance on the south side of Canal Street between Hudson and Watts


 

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Hunter MFA Thesis Part II
May
17
to Jun 3

Hunter MFA Thesis Part II

Hunter MFA Thesis Part II

May 17th–June 2nd, 2018
Monday–Sunday, 11am–6pm
 

Opening Reception:
May 17th, 6–9pm


Featuring the work of:

Ben Browne
Justin Cloud
Sarah Creagan
Paola Di Tolla
Emily Furr
Carter Johnson
Jule Korneffel
Madhini Nirmal
Russell Perkins
Leonard Reibstein
Todd (T. Eliott Mansa) Thomas
Andy Van Dinh

For more information, please visit:

http://www.mfa205hudson.org/mfa-thesis-exhibitions/spring-2018/

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Hunter MFA Thesis Part I
Apr
19
to May 5

Hunter MFA Thesis Part I

Hunter MFA Thesis Part I

April 19th, 2018–May 5th, 2018
Monday–Sunday, 11am–6pm

 

Opening Reception:
April 19th, 6–9pm


Featuring the work of:

Patrick Costello
Theresa Daddezio
Rachelle Dang
Pablo Diaz
Mikey Estes
Zac Hacmon
Michelle O'Connell
Hector René Membreno Canales
Becky Jane Rosen

For more information, please visit:

http://www.mfa205hudson.org/mfa-thesis-exhibitions/spring-2018/

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Curatorial Talk: Rosario Güiraldes of The Drawing Center
Mar
29
12:30 PM12:30

Curatorial Talk: Rosario Güiraldes of The Drawing Center

Leticia Obeid, still from  B. , 2008. Video, 58 min. Courtesy of the artist.

Leticia Obeid, still from B., 2008. Video, 58 min. Courtesy of the artist.

Curatorial Talk: Rosario Güiraldes of the Drawing Center
Thursday, March 29, 2018, 6:30–8pm
Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Copy, Translate, Repeat: Contemporary Art from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros


Güiraldes will be discussing her curatorial practice at the Drawing Center and in her past projects, engaging with and expanding on themes and questions brought up by the exhibition on view.

Rosario Güiraldes is Assistant Curator and Co-Director of the Open Sessions artist program at The Drawing Center. She has organized curatorial projects and public programs at the Barcelona Museum of Contemporary Art (MACBA); University Museum of Contemporary Art (MUAC), Mexico City; Hessel Museum of Art at Bard College, the Judd Foundation, the International Studio & Curatorial Program, and the Consulate General of Argentina, all New York; and Fundación Proa, Buenos Aires. Her most recent project Forensic Architecture: Towards an Investigative Aesthetics was presented in different versions at the Barcelona Museum of Contemporary Art (2017), and at the University Museum of Contemporary Art, Mexico City (2017–18). Güiraldes has edited numerous publications, such as Pioneer Works Journal, Forensic Architecture: Hacia una estética investigative, Staging, The Present is the Form of All Life: The Time Capsules of Ant Farm and LST, aCCseSsions, Compos, and Correspondencia. At Fundación Proa, she also organized Forensis (2015) with Anselm Franke and Eyal Weizman. Güiraldes holds a B.Arch from the Universidad de Buenos Aires and an MA in Curatorial Studies from the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College.

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Student Curators' Hours at 205 Hudson Gallery
Mar
24
8:00 AM08:00

Student Curators' Hours at 205 Hudson Gallery

Harper Montgomery leading a tour of  Copy, Translate, Repeat: Contemporary Art from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros . Photograph by Natalie Conn.

Harper Montgomery leading a tour of Copy, Translate, Repeat: Contemporary Art from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros.
Photograph by Natalie Conn.

Student Curators' Hours at 205 Hudson Gallery
Organized in conjunction with the exhibition Copy, Translate, Repeat: Contemporary Art from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros

Saturday, March 17 and March 24, 1–3:00pm


Join Advanced Curatorial Certificate students and co-curators in the gallery anytime from 1 to 3pm. We will be exploring the rich source material behind works in the exhibition through self-guided itineraries, short interactive tours given by the curators, and related performances.

This event is free and open to the public.

View Event →
Student Curators' Hours at 205 Hudson Gallery
Mar
17
8:00 AM08:00

Student Curators' Hours at 205 Hudson Gallery

Harper Montgomery leading a tour of  Copy, Translate, Repeat: Contemporary Art from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros . Photograph by Natalie Conn.

Harper Montgomery leading a tour of Copy, Translate, Repeat: Contemporary Art from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros.
Photograph by Natalie Conn.

Student Curators' Hours at 205 Hudson Gallery
Organized in conjunction with the exhibition Copy, Translate, Repeat: Contemporary Art from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros

Saturday, March 17 and March 24, 1–3:00pm


Join Advanced Curatorial Certificate students and co-curators in the gallery anytime from 1 to 3pm. We will be exploring the rich source material behind works in the exhibition through self-guided itineraries, short interactive tours given by the curators, and related performances.

This event is free and open to the public.

View Event →
Feb
9
to Apr 1

Copy, Translate, Repeat: Contemporary Art from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros

Copy, Translate, Repeat: Contemporary Art from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros

Jonathas de Andrade, Armando Andrade Tudela, Juan Carlos Araujo, Waltercio Caldas, Mariana Castillo Deball, Elena Damiani, Josefina Guilisasti, Leandro Katz, Jorge Macchi, Leticia Obeid, Dario Robleto, José Antonio Suárez Londoño, Christian Vinck

Curated by Prof. Harper Montgomery with Jenn Bratovich and Hunter MA and MFA Students enrolled in the Advanced Curatorial Certificate 

Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Gallery
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013

Entrance on the south side of Canal Street between Hudson and Watts

February 8–April 1, 2018
Opening Reception: February 8, 2018, 6–8pm

At a moment of much debate about the status of global contemporary art, this exhibition examines how artworks drawn from the contemporary collection of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros navigate this complex issue by embracing appropriative strategies for making art. The appropriative act enables the artists in this exhibition to confound conventions of time and space and question narratives of history, art, and progress. By repeating and copying art historical and archival sources, literary texts, and objects made far away and long ago, they collapse distance as near and far or “here” and “there.” In one way or another, all these artists are intervening, inserting themselves, repeating some type of source. If they are all devoted to repeating already extant works and images, they are also dedicated to exploring the cracks, the potential veins of growth and expansion, exploration and discovery, that always existed within the “originals.” Waltercio Caldas, for instance, invites us to join him in his study of Velázquez’s mastery of pictorial space by presenting a depopulated version of the artist’s Las meninas. Whereas in works by Christian Vinck and Mariana Castillo Deball, authorship is replaced by the even more extreme authority of the colonial archive or Primitivist art collection, so that appropriation reveals the powerful structures of classification and image-making that underlie the power of nation states. Even more, in Vidas paralelas Jorge Macchi presents two panes of glass which have shattered in identical patterns, completely confounding our sense of the veracity of time and materiality. We know that one must be the source and one the copy, but we are unable to sort out which is which.

Transformation, travel, memory, landscape, modernism, architecture, ethnography, as well as the photograph, the moving image, the handcrafted object, the presence of the body, and painting are themes brought to bear by the artworks in the exhibition. Although their tactics are varied, the artists all take intensely personal approaches to appropriation to question an authority greater than the market or authorship. Directing their critiques instead toward the construction of culture itself, they work against standards set in Europe and the United States even while they are historically participants in these very traditions. They use appropriation as a means of inhabiting works and documents of the past to bring to bear generative qualities that have not yet been explored. In the end, it is by processing a “source” or “object of critique” through their subjectivities that artists generate new experiences of the sensations of the nonlinear often collapsed and layered temporal and spatial registers in which they live and move.

The exhibition brings together a group of artists who have been shown in New York and are collected by major institutions here (Macchi, Caldas, Katz, Castillo Deball, Suárez Londoño, de Andrade, and Robleto) and artists who will be shown for the first time at Hunter College (Araujo, Damiani, Guilisasti, Obeid, and Vinck). As the first occasion on which such a considerable group of contemporary works from the Cisneros Collection have been shown in the United States, this exhibition is unique in that it showcases the innovative challenges the collection has posed to the question of how, where, and to what end contemporary art has been produced around, in, and about the region we call Latin America. Through the partnership between Hunter and the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, the collection was made available as a study resource for twelve students from the MA and MFA programs—and participants in the Curatorial Certificate Program. These students contributed to every step required in conceiving and executing the exhibition, including selection of artworks, layout and design, writing of didactic texts, and the crafting of scholarly essays for the catalogue.

Copy, Translate, Repeat: Contemporary Art from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros is made possible by the generous support of the David Bershad Family Foundation, the Susan V. Bershad Charitable Fund, Inc., Carol and Arthur Goldberg, and Agnes Gund in support of the Curatorial Certificate Program.

About the Advanced Curatorial Certificate
Hunter’s Department of Art & Art History has long provided its graduate students the opportunity to work with faculty and our galleries’ professional staff on exhibitions of exceptional quality.  The new Advanced Curatorial Certificate builds on that tradition and the curatorial interests and ambitions of Hunter faculty and students—and our commitment to exhibitions whose themes, theses, and checklists have been developed and honed by our students. The program is designed to offer both a theoretical and historical grounding in curatorial practices and practical experience in exhibition organization and display and object research and preservation. Every student enrolled in the certificate program has the opportunity to work on an exhibition from inception to fruition, whether in the annual Curatorial Seminar or in faculty-supervised guided internships in the Hunter College Art Galleries or in museums and galleries beyond the college.

coleccioncisneros.org

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Dec
14
to Jan 7

Hunter MFA Thesis Part II

Hunter MFA Thesis Part II

Hunter College MFA Thesis Exhibition Part II

December 14th, 2017 – January 7, 2018
Opening Reception: December 14th, 6–9pm 

Open Tuesday – Sunday, 1-6 pm, closed Christmas Day and New Year’s Day, by appointment Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve

205 Hudson Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
Entrance on the south side of Canal Street between Hudson and Watts

Featuring artists:
Sam Bornstein
Jeff Conefry
Maggie Ellis
Dan Fig
Eri King
Nikki Mehle
Zatara McIntyre
Dionis Ortiz
Eugina Song
Yang Yu
Julie Zhu

In addition to three levels of installed 2D and 3D works, there will be concerts on Dec. 15, Dec. 19, and Dec. 20, and programming throughout the run of the show.

View Event →
Nov
16
to Dec 3

Hunter MFA Thesis Part I

confluence_postcard1.jpg

Hunter MFA Thesis Part I

Confluence: Uncertain Archives

November 16–December 3, 2017
Opening Reception November 16th, 6–9pm 

205 Hudson Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
Entrance on the south side of Canal Street between Hudson and Watts

Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

Jongwon Bae
Anael Berkovitz
Christian Breed
Alta Buden
Victoria Dolloff
Christian Hendricks
Katy McCarthy
Lang Zhang

“Archives are not static. Their material reality changes over time – decayed, displaced, reorganized – and their meanings shift as well, depending on the moment and context in which we encounter them.” — Mariam Ghani, Field Notes for What we Left Unfinished

How do ideas, actions, objects and events converge for history to “happen”? Can this confluence be measured? How do we reflect on it? We mine archives for ideas, stories and people and end up also finding conflicts, gaps, and redactions. The sources we draw upon are personal and public: some artists in the show address the history of space, while others speak to a more recent past. Uncertainty occurs any time we try to construct meaning from perceptive and subjective experiences.This confluence is where we connect: to question, deviate from, and contribute.

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Oct
14
9:00 AM09:00

Tibetan Thangkas: The Art of Visualization

Tibetan Thangkas: The Art of Visualization

Tibetan Thangkas: The Art of Visualization
A talk by Ven. Khenpo Tenzin Norgay Rinpoche 

Organized in conjunction with "Ugo Rondinone: I ♥︎ John Giorno" for the chapter John Giorno and Tibetan Buddhism at 205 Hudson Gallery, Hunter College Art Galleries

With works by John Giorno and Ugo Rondinone and thangkas selected from the collection of the Rubin Museum of Art

Saturday, October 14, 2017
3pm

205 Hudson Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013

Entrance on the south side of Canal between Hudson and Watts

Iconic figures represented in Tibetan thangkas, or painted scrolls, mirror aspects of our own enlightened nature. Depicted in their sacred environment, or mandala, both figure and ground act as supports for a devotee’s meditation practices. With Khenpo Norgay Rinpoche’s guidance, we will enter into the mandala of thangkas on display at the gallery.

Ven. Khenpo Tenzin Norgay Rinpoche completed the nine-year program of study at the Ngagyur Nyingma Institute, an advanced Buddhist studies and research center at Namdroling Monastery in southern India, and taught at the Institute for three years. Formally enthroned as “Khenpo” by His Holiness Penor Rinpoche in 1998, he was assigned to teach at the Buddhist college of the Palyul monastery in Tibet, where he served on the faculty for two years.

Since 2005, Khen Rinpoche has been the resident lama at the Nyingma Palyul Dharma Center (NPDC) in New York City. NPDC serves as a locus for students of the Palyul tradition in the metropolitan area, and welcomes visitors from around the world to participate in all its activities.  The center hosts public talks, formal teachings, and empowerments from the Palyul tradition, as well as a variety of cultural events at venues throughout the city.

For more information about Khenpo Norgay Rinpoche or the Palyul tradition and retreats please visit:
www.palyulnyc.org
www.palyul.org
www.retreat.palyul.org

View Event →
Oct
12
1:00 PM13:00

Replica, Originality, and the Art of Devotion

Replica, Originality, and the Art of Devotion

Replica, Originality, and the Art of Devotion

 A panel discussion with Marcus Boon, John Giorno, Ariana Maki and Tsherin Sherpa

Organized by Wen-Shing Chou and Sarah Watson

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Ugo Rondinone: I ♥ John Giorno for the chapter “John Giorno and Tibetan Buddhism” with works by John Giorno and Ugo Rondinone and thangkas selected from the collection of the Rubin Museum of Art

Thursday, October 12, 2017
7pm

205 Hudson Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013

Entrance on the south side of Canal between Hudson and Watts

Created in the forms of paintings and sculptures, Tibetan Buddhist images are part of a sophisticated artistic and religious tradition whose efficacy is underscored by the interconnected concepts of replication and originality. This conversation positions the image-making tradition in relation to the acts of copying, repetition, and rehearsal that have been central to contemporary art and culture. The aim is to offer fresh perspectives on Tibetan Buddhist images that have rarely been understood outside of their cultural and devotional contexts, and to forge new connections between different spheres of artistic practice, both traditional and modern.

Marcus Boon is a writer and Professor of English at York University in Toronto. He is the author of The Road of Excess: A History of Writers on Drugs (Harvard, 2002); In Praise of Copying (Harvard, 2010); and is a co-author with Timothy Morton and Eric Cazdyn of Nothing: Three Inquiries in Buddhism (Chicago, 2015). He is co-editing a book on Practice with Gabriel Levine (MIT/Whitechapel, forthcoming) and is currently finishing a book on sound and ontology called The Politics of Vibration.

John Giorno is an artistic innovator who has been defying conventional definitions of poet, performer, political activist, Tibetan Buddhist, and visual artist since he emerged upon the New York art scene during the late 1950s. In the 1960s, he began producing multi-media, multi-sensory events concurrent with Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Inevitable. He worked with Rauschenberg’s Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T) in 1966, and with Bob Moog in 1967–68. His breakthroughs in this area include Dial-A-Poem, which was first presented in 1968 at the Architectural Society of New York, and was later included in the MoMA’s Information exhibition in 1970. His contributions are significant to many culturally defining moments: the Beat generation, Pop Art, Punk, the Pictures Generation, and the hip-hop era. Giorno’s work is included in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; the Musée National d´Art Moderne, Paris; and the Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane; among others.

Ariana Maki holds a Ph.D. in Art History with a focus on Buddhist Art and specializations in Himalayan and South Asian art, as well as a minor concentration in Islamic art and architecture. She is presently a Research Scientist in Religious Studies at the University of Virginia. She is also Associate Curator of Himalayan Art Resources and maintains a research affiliation with the National Library and Archives of Bhutan. Maki's research interests include the relationships between text, politics and visual representation, the development of Himalayan visual arts, and the intersections of art and ritual.

Tsherin Sherpa was born in Kathmandu, Nepal in 1968 and currently works and resides in California. From the age of 12, he studied traditional Tibetan thangka painting with his father Master Urgen Dorje, a renowned thangka artist from Ngyalam, Tibet. In 1998, Sherpa immigrated to California, where he taught traditional thangka painting at various Buddhist Centers until he began to explore his own style, reimagining tantric motifs, symbols, colors and gestures placed in resolutely contemporary compositions. He has exhibited internationally, including in the 1st Kathmandu Triennale of Contemporary Art, Nepal (2017); the 8th Asia Pacific Triennale of Contemporary Art, Brisbane (2015); 2nd Dhaka Art Summit, Bangladesh (2014); the Queens Museum of Art, New York (2014); MASS MoCA, North Adams (2014); the Songzhuang Art Center, Beijing (2010); and the Rubin Museum of Art, New York (2010). His works are in many collections in Europe, America and Asia, including the Queensland Art Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane; the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco; the Samdani Art Foundation, Dhaka; and the Rubin Museum of Art.

View Event →
Sep
30
9:00 AM09:00

Walking the Talk: The Noble Eightfold Path

Walking the Talk: The Noble Eightfold Path

Walking the Talk: The Noble Eightfold Path
A talk by Ven. Khenpo Tenzin Norgay Rinpoche 

Organized in conjunction with the exhibition Ugo Rondinone: I ♥ John Giorno and Tibetan Buddhism at 205 Hudson Gallery, Hunter College Art Galleries

With works by John Giorno and Ugo Rondinone and thangkas selected from the collection of the Rubin Museum of Art

Saturday, September 30, 2017
3pm

205 Hudson Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
Entrance on the south side of Canal between Hudson and Watts

The Buddha lived in times not unlike our own. Amidst pervasive socio-economic and political turmoil, he questioned the wisdom of prevailing cultural-religious norms. His analysis of the true nature of things and events—with the intent to liberate all beings from suffering—forged a pathway to enlightenment. “The Noble Eightfold Path” lists essentials required for taking this walk.

Ven. Khenpo Tenzin Norgay Rinpoche completed the nine-year program of study at the Ngagyur Nyingma Institute, an advanced Buddhist studies and research center at Namdroling Monastery in southern India, and taught at the Institute for three years. Formally enthroned as “Khenpo” by His Holiness Penor Rinpoche in 1998, he was assigned to teach at the Buddhist college of the Palyul monastery in Tibet, where he served on the faculty for two years.

Since 2005, Khen Rinpoche has been the resident lama at the Nyingma Palyul Dharma Center (NPDC) in New York City. NPDC serves as a locus for students of the Palyul tradition in the metropolitan area, and welcomes visitors from around the world to participate in all its activities.  The center hosts public talks, formal teachings, and empowerments from the Palyul tradition, as well as a variety of cultural events at venues throughout the city.

For more information about Khenpo Norgay Rinpoche or the Palyul tradition and retreats please visit:
www.palyulnyc.org
www.palyul.org
www.retreat.palyul.org

View Event →
Jul
8
9:00 AM09:00

The Four Noble Truths, a talk by Ven. Khenpo Tenzin Norgay Rinpoche

The Four Noble Truths, a talk by Ven. Khenpo Tenzin Norgay Rinpoche

Organized in conjunction with "Ugo Rondinone: I ♥︎ John Giorno" for the chapter John Giorno and Tibetan Buddhism at 205 Hudson Gallery, Hunter College Art Galleries

With works by John Giorno and Ugo Rondinone and thangkas selected from the collection of the Rubin Museum of Art

Saturday, July 8
3pm

205 Hudson Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
Entrance on the south side of Canal between Hudson and Watts

Deer Park (Sarnath, India) circa 500 BCE: Siddhartha Gautama delivers first post enlightenment teaching, “The Four Noble Truths.” Roughly translated as the truth of suffering, the cause of suffering, the end of suffering, and the path that frees us from suffering (duhkha, samudaya, nirodha, marga), the truths serve as the foundation for the entire corpus of the Buddha’s 84,000 teachings on attaining complete liberation. Simply put, in the midst of sometimes unbearable suffering the truths are a balm, a prescription for healing. They outline a refreshing pathway, just as walkable here and now as it was 2,500 years ago.

Ven. Khenpo Tenzin Norgay Rinpoche completed the nine-year program of study at the Ngagyur Nyingma Institute, an advanced Buddhist studies and research center at Namdroling Monastery in southern India, and taught at the Institute for three years. Formally enthroned as “Khenpo” by His Holiness Penor Rinpoche in 1998, he was assigned to teach at the Buddhist college of the Palyul monastery in Tibet, where he served on the faculty for two years.

Since 2005, Khen Rinpoche has been the resident lama at the Nyingma Palyul Dharma Center (NPDC) in New York City. NPDC serves as a locus for students of the Palyul tradition in the metropolitan area, and welcomes visitors from around the world to participate in all its activities. The center hosts public talks, formal teachings, and empowerments from the Palyul tradition, as well as a variety of cultural events at venues throughout the city.

For more information about Khen Rinpoche or the Palyul tradition and retreats please visit:
www.palyulnyc.org
www.palyul.org
www.retreat.palyul.org

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Jun
24
9:00 AM09:00

Peace and Harmony Through Mindfulness

Peace and Harmony Through Mindfulness
A talk by Ven. Khenpo Tsewang Dongyal Rinpoche

Organized in conjunction with the exhibition Ugo Rondinone: I ♥ John Giorno

Saturday, June 24, 2017
3pm

205 Hudson Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
Entrance on the south side of Canal between Hudson and Watts

Peace and Harmony Through Mindfulness, a talk by Ven. Khenpo Tsewang Dongyal Rinpoche

Mindfulness is staying in the present moment and observing our body, feelings, thoughts, and senses. By practicing mindfulness, we discover a big, open space that allows us to be non-reactive to our outer and inner experiences. It is like all our experiences are dear old friends, and we say "Nice to see you" when they arrive and "Have a nice journey" when they go! This open space brings a lot of equanimity and compassion to our lives, which brings peace to ourselves and harmonizes our actions with others.

Ven. Khenpo Tsewang Dongyal Rinpoche was born in eastern Tibet and enthroned as a Nyingmapa abbot by His Holiness Dudjom Rinpoche. He traveled and studied with H.H. Dudjom Rinpoche, as well as with his late brother, Vajrayana master and scholar Ven. Khenchen Palden Sherab Rinpoche, and his father, the hidden yogi Lama Chimed Namgyal.  As a holder of the complete Nyingmapa lineage, Khenpo Tsewang Rinpoche is fully versed in the Theravada, Mahayana, and Vajrayana schools, and is a master of Dzogchen. He has co-authored over 25 Dharma books in English with Khenchen Palden Sherab Rinpoche, and travels throughout the world giving teachings, empowerments, and personal guidance in fluent English at numerous retreats.

Ven. Khenchen Palden Sherab Rinpoche and Ven. Khenpo Tsewang Dongyal Rinpoche established the Padmasambhava Buddhist Center (PBC) in 1989 to preserve the authentic message of Buddha Shakyamuni and Guru Padmasambhava in its entirety, and in particular to teach the traditions of the Nyingma school and Vajrayana Buddhism. PBC includes over 20 centers in the U.S.A., India, Puerto Rico, Latvia, and Russia, as well as monastic institutions in India, the U.S.A., and Russia.

For more information about Khenpo Tsewang Rinpoche's activities or the Padmasambhava Buddhist Center please contact:
Padma Samye Ling
618 Buddha Highway
Sidney Center, NY 13839
+1 (607) 865-8068
www.padmasambhava.org
Youtube: www.padmasambhava.org/youtube
Facebook: Padmasambhava Buddhist Center
Twitter: KhenpoRinpoche
Instagram: www.instagram.com/khenporinpoche

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